Freedom Is Not Free – Earn It

Carrollton, Near New Orleans, LA – September 26, 1863

Friend Charlotte,

Your favor of August 2nd which came to hand during my absence has been handed to me and I shall proceed to answer your questions with pleasure.

The “Confederate Script” of which you spoke is worth nothing here – is not passable.

The letter you referred to has either fallen into the hands of someone or been lost. Captain Patterson of the Pioneer Corps says the letter never came to his office.You spoke about William having twenty- two dollars standing out among the boys, I have endeavored to ascertain who was owing him but as yet have not found a single one.

There are any number of men in the army who, for a paltry sum, are ever ready to deny their indebtedness provided they can do so without being detected. Transactions among soldiers, as a general thing, are simply verbal and unless the men who owe your husband are honest enough to forward you the money – you can set it down as lost.

In answer to the interrogatory whether William ever complained of being neglected or mistreated by you, I am happy to say that I never heard him speak of his wife except in terms of endearment. Have often heard him regret his inability to make you more comfortable pecuniarily as well as sorrow at the deprivation or loss of your society and that of his children.

Absence, you know, serves to strengthen our affection. It also makes us appreciate better, the blessings of home. Speaking of home reminds me of having just returned from its fond endearments. Was on a brief visit to see my family (who by the way live five miles East of Wooster) I had intended to give you a call but my furlough being so very brief I was unable to do so.

While in Wooster, I had the pleasure of seeing Mr. McCormick, (William’s father) to whom I related the circumstances connected with William’s death.  I have nothing more of special note to add everything being quiet in our department, I therefore beg leave to close,

Yours respectfully, 
C. B. Anderson

P.S. Andrew Sprowl from your vicinity is well, the 16th Regiment is now at Brashin (Brashear) City – I will rejoin it tomorrow.

You see, we are the products of those who have gone before us.  It is up to us to decide if we will be the sum of their positive attributes or of their negative attributes. It is up to us to honor and preserve their memories by doing as William stated in his last letter, “If God spares me to get home, I shall try to live to his Honor & Glory and lead a consistent life.”

When I reflect and empathize with these people I want to honor his words and shout out, in this era, “Give my best wishes to all the friends and let them know that I am for God and my Country, for Truth, Justice and Right, in all things pertaining to this glorious Union!”

And when my time comes and I leave this life, how honored I would be to have said of me, “As a person, Joni was always punctual and faithful in the discharge of her duties. As an associate, she was respected and beloved by all who knew her. In her death her comrades loose a cheerful, kind-hearted messmate – her Country, a brave and true Patriot – her comrade, a noble wife – and her children, a fond and indulgent mother.”

This is why patriotic buntings surround Joni’s Front Porch and why I love all things fair and just.  You may think I’m crazy but I get that from some of my other ancestors I haven’t told you about…

Thank you to all of you who have followed my tribute, I hope it has touched your heart and lit a fire for liberty in your soul.

(In honor of those who shaped me, and in conjunction with the 2012 Republican National Convention which I am fortunate enough to be able to attend, each evening I will post a blog about my convention experiences, and each morning I will post a personal family document or historical story which will help you understand what makes me tick.  If you read all the historical posts, the last day, I promise you, you will feel the gratitude I do for our patriots who sacrificed their lives and fortunes for our freedoms.)

Premonition

Rear of Vicksburg, Mississippi – July 5th, 1863

Mrs. Lottie McCormick,

Your note of June 21 has just come to hand and I will reply to your inquiries without delay – Your husband – Madam, is interred on a beautiful knoll on the south side of the main road – two miles east of Vicksburg or not far from the “two mile bridge” on the Vicksburg and Jackson Railroad, Warren County, Mississippi.

He was buried decently – had a good coffin, which “by the way” is more than can be said of most others who fell in Rear of this “Rebel City.”

William, as I have said in my first note, had many friends – was esteemed by all his associates. He of course had his faults as most others do but they were few and I think they deserved ones pity more than censure. I have been acquainted with your husband for several years – always agreed very well together except on “political questions”, men you know will differ.

You wished to know how William had enjoyed himself – well his health had not been very good for over a month which dispirited him to a certain extent, but at the time of his death he had almost entirely regained his wonted vigor both of body and mind.

I am none of those who believe in foreordination, but I must acknowledge that there was something strange connected with William’s death.

On the evening of June first we had eaten supper and were about starting to work when William remarked to us, his messmates, that he felt a strange fear in going up there to work, that he was almost certain of being shot. We advised him not to go, but he replied that if he did not go, he would be accused by the commanding officer of playing off, he therefore went and you know the sequel. It seems from this that he had a strange and unaccountable foreboding or presentment that he was to die.

Fearing that your patience is already wearing, I must hasten to conclude, I am happy to announce to you the glad tidings that Vicksburg is at last ours. The enemy surrendered yesterday about noon. The victory is a glorious one, but dearly bought. The greater part of our army are now on the way to Jackson to meet Johnson’s forces. Our troops are all in fine spirits.

With great respect I remain

Yours, 
Cyrus B. Anderson

P.S. If Marion H. Dodd still lives in Fredericksburg, please give him my regards – tell him I am well.

(In honor of those who shaped me, and in conjunction with the 2012 Republican National Convention which I am fortunate enough to be able to attend, each evening I will post a blog about my convention experiences, and each morning I will post a personal family document or historical story which will help you understand what makes me tick.  If you read all the historical posts, the last day, I promise you, you will feel the gratitude I do for our patriots who sacrificed their lives and fortunes for our freedoms.)

“Bury Me Decently”

At the young age of 29 William McCormick had seen more than almost any of us today could imagine.  As a member of the Pioneer Corps he tore down enemy fortification in the night, and by day built Union breastworks to protect his army.  He was brave, and now he was William McCormick - 16th Ohio Volunteer Infantrygone.  Someone had to tell Charlotte.

16th O.V.I. In Rear of Vicksburg, Mississippi – June 2nd, 1863

Miss Lottie McCormick,

With feelings of sadness mingled with pity, I have seated myself to inform you of the death of your husband, William McCormick.

He was, as you are aware, on “detached duty” with the Pioneer Corps for some time. Since our arrival here we have been engaged in erecting fortifications.

Last night we worked in close proximity to the Enemies works only 80 yards from one of their main forts. The night being very light – we were discovered, and fired on by the Enemy who were concealed in their entrenchments. In the 2nd or 3rd volley William received a mortal wound – the ball entering near the lower extremity of the right lung and passing out just below the left shoulder blade. He also received a buck shot in the right arm just below the elbow. I was near him at the time he was wounded and helped to carry him off the field. He was wounded a few minutes before 12 o’clock and died about one. He remained conscious until a few moments before his death.

In reply to my interrogations as to what word he wished to send home – he requested me to tell his “companion” and friends that he died for his Country. He also requested me to retrieve his pocket book trinkets and send them home, and finally he entreated us, his messmates, to bury him decently all of which requests shall be fulfilled. His pocket book contains twenty eight dollars. I will send this to you with other things with Mr. Garret Dorland whom he gave sixty five dollars a few days since. It will be left with R. R. Donnelly of Wooster.

In conclusion let me say that William McCormick as a soldier has always been punctual and faithful in the discharge of his duties. As an associate, he was respected and beloved by all who knew him. In his death, his comrades loose a cheerful, kind-hearted messmate – his Country, a brave and true Patriot – his consort, a noble husband – and his children, a fond and indulgent father.

With warmest sympathy for self and children and with an ardent hope that kind heaven may enable you to bear this sad calamity with Christian patience and resignation, I subscribe myself,

Yours, 
Cyrus B. Anderson

(In honor of those who shaped me, and in conjunction with the 2012 Republican National Convention which I am fortunate enough to be able to attend, each evening I will post a blog about my convention experiences, and each morning I will post a personal family document or historical story which will help you understand what makes me tick.  If you read all the historical posts, the last day, I promise you, you will feel the gratitude I do for our patriots who sacrificed their lives and fortunes for our freedoms.)

Oh The Irony, The Twist

Today’s Letter will not be from William McCormick of the 16th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. You will have to wait till tomorrow for the next “McCormick Family letter.”

Simply put, when I read this letter, my jaw literally dropped, I sat back in my chair and wondered in awe at the role God has played in my life, in Rachel’s life, in all our lives.

This letter is lengthy so I abridged it.

Head Quarters Camp Near Black River – Thursday, June 4th, 1863

Dear Friends,

I’m again seated for the purpose of penning you these few lines in answer to yours of the 20th and 21st.

Sister Rach, I only wish that I had the time and means by which to give you a full history of all that I have seen and passed through, but no one can tell the scenes of battle fields which I, with many others, have passed over and more than all this I do not wish you to know it all. I hope that the day may come and that soon I can sit down and relate all that I have seen and passed through during the short time I have been in service.

I have been in four battles and generally hard ones and cannot today show the scratches of a bullet. Thus far, I have been lucky and more than that, able for what ever was my duty. Health and bravery is what matters to the soldier and one who has not the spunk to bear the fire should never enlist in such a cause.

We have men in the regiment, yes, in our own company, who have never yet been in a fight and how did they escape so many? Why it was just by hiding in some dark corner where they could not be found. Oh that such may never be the history of WHC (Wiliam H. Cary).

Unlike the Navy, during the Red River campaign, private boats were confiscated and outfitted into gun boat along, the Red River, the Big Black River and the Mississippi River

Well Rach, I must just here share a little about the manner in which the Rebs do their fighting. You no doubt have heard of the gunboat fight at Grand Gulf which is now in our possession. I gazed upon that scene with the greatest anxiety imaginable for I expected to have to take footing on the bank, in front of the rebel breastworks, but as our gunboat was unsuccessful in silencing their batteries which guarded the river, we could not land.  We were on the boats, about 20,000 of us and lay about four miles up the river where we had full view of the entire fight which lasted five hours.

I must tell you that it was not the Rebs which done the fighting at this point – for when we come to find out they had four poor blacks chained to the guns so that they could not get away. This was a hard berth for the poor fellows but they hid themselves so that they was not in so much danger.

I have seen slavery in its fullest extent and have less sympathy for slaveholders than ever. I consider it a curse to any nation, but I hope that slavery is no more or if it should still exist, that is may be carried on in a different manner.

Today the cannoning at Vicksburg is very heavy. Our men are undermining their forts and expect to blow them up tomorrow, at least such is the report now in camp. If they should succeed in this work it will give us the victory at once.

William McCormick of Fredericksburg, now a member of the Pioneer Corps, is said to have been killed yesterday while returning from this work of undermining.

Our loss is still small at this place considering the seventeen days fight which we have had. I think that I can write to you in a few days telling all how it looks in Vicksburg, for we will be taken in there as soon as we gain the place.

All is quiet on the Black River today. Rach, I shall not detain you longer at present. Please write soon and tell me all the news, give my respects to all the friends.
W. H. Cary

THEY KNEW EACH OTHER? It would be over 60 years until my own grandparents married, that these families would be related. I still can’t believe they knew each other and that I have both of these sets of letters. I don’t believe in coincidences. I believe in miracles. And my heart breaks to know what tomorrows letter to Charlotte will bring.

(In honor of those who shaped me, and in conjunction with the 2012 Republican National Convention which I am fortunate enough to be able to attend, each evening I will post a blog about my convention experiences, and each morning I will post a personal family document or historical story which will help you understand what makes me tick.  If you read all the historical posts, the last day, I promise you, you will feel the gratitude I do for our patriots who sacrificed their lives and fortunes for our freedoms.)

Where Much Is Given

Symone Massey, Michelle Scharf & Joni Crane

Symone Massey, Michelle Scharf & Joni Crane

Yesterday I took some serious time from my day and privately asked the Lord to bless me in my effort to do a little good in conjunction with my trip to Tampa. Cruising the Web a few weeks ago, I came across a website called wheremuchisgiven.org. I recognized the phrase from a saying I had heard, “Where much is given, much is required.”

The page said you could order a business card for free that would have the words “It’s your turn” on it. The idea being that if you did a kindness for anyone, whether big or small, you were in essence changing a life and thus changing the world. Instead of accepting money or uncomfortable gratitude for your deed, you would hand them the card and challenge them to pay it forward.

As my friends know, that is my personal mothership.  I think we all have the opportunity to change our little corners of the world, and to clarify, I usually try to change the world for good not evil.  I am a good witch not a bad witch.

I wrote a note to the page creator and told him I was heading to the Republican National Convention and could offer to hand out some cards to get the idea going in different states and in return received a challenge from him, to find 50 people, one in each state to share the mission and 100 cards with.

The first challenge appeared when the box of 5000 cards arrived at my home and on lifting it, I realized it was equal to a piece of luggage. But I distributed the 5000 cards throughout 3 bags. Yesterday however, it occurred to me that I might meet people along the way, so I unpacked and put together ten envelopes of 100 cards each.

I had only mentioned it briefly to my friends, they knew I had some weird idea and packed some ridiculous amount of stuff I had not elaborated on. So, as we sat in the Salt Lake Airport and had a wonderful conversation with a kind lady from Alabama, they were taken aback when all at once, bravery overcame me and I bluntly asked if she would be interested in taking this idea and 100 cards to her state.

My friends, who are always very tolerant of my strange ideas, watched as a smile spread across her face and she said she would absolutely love this opportunity.  Then it began, they caught to dream too and we spent a day getting to know people from all over this nation and Canada too.  Today the program has begun in Iowa, Arizona, California, Idaho, Alabama and tomorrow we meet with delegates from Georgia.

We made friends, we heard stories.  I sat with Maria Luna of Salt Lake who told me she had been told Republicans hate Mexicans.  We talked about immigration and work visas and parted with a surprising understanding that our party values are not what they are portrayed to be by the liberal media.

We spoke with a young father from Houston who works at an oil refinery about energy policy and struggling to rear a family with an administration that over regulates small businesses till they have to give up and close their doors.

We arrived at our hotel to find that the Convention has been delayed a day and instead of our intended trip to the LDS Cattle Ranch we are going to do a Utah Delegation service project and have an extended breakfast honoring Senator Orrin G. Hatch and have a few surprise guests with us on Monday.

Tomorrow I will be interviewed by Lincoln Brown of KVEL and the Boston NPR, I have to try to be a little interesting I suppose and in the a.m. a few of us who are LDS will be attending a Tampa Ward near our hotel.

Lastly, if you read my blog post called “Ticket to Tampa” I joked about Michelle and I sitting in the very back of the plane while important people were in 1st class.  Well call me a seer,  they gave us the back row seats and Senator Kay Hutchinson of Texas was in first class. We knew she was there but am pretty sure no one whispered in her ear who those two Utah gals in the back row were.

So to end a long day, let me just say, we actually changed a little bit of the world today. Somehow, somewhere, about 500 good deeds will get done, and perhaps those 500 who receive those will go on to continue the trend.  Go check out their page and maybe challenge your family to give away a card each month.  Good Night, till tomorrow!

How Committed Are We To Freedom? No REALLY…

As I read these stories I balk at how committed they were for the cause of freedom, friends died, homes lost, fortunes gone, relationships severed and still they went on for a great cause.  As an heir to these freedoms I feel embarrassed to complain about a day putting up campaign signs, or making calls in a phone bank.

For a few days I have been telling you the story of William and Charlotte McCormick, my Great Great Grandparents, through the letters William wrote to Charlotte while he served in the Civil War.

But what I haven’t mentioned is that when my father brought me these Civil War letters, there was a larger, more expansive set of letters from two other Ohio soldiers.  These letters written to my Great Great Grandmother Rachel Cary from her brother William Cary and his friend Jacob B. Pinkerton, who married Rachel when he came back from the war.

Cary and Pinkerton both served in the 120th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  Cary is an eloquent introspective writer and Pinkerton is more detailed and personable, of course, he is in love with Rachel.

In the letter I posted today, you can imagine William’s frustration and emotional agony as he writes “I have had no letter from you in five weeks.”

As I read the “Cary and Pinkerton” letters, this was explained … JB Pinkerton wrote on January 16th, 1863:

“I am so glad you write often so that I can expect a letter from you every mail we get, for we do not get a mail every day, and not every mail that is started reaches us. The Rebels captured our mail a few weeks ago and got quite a lot of our letters. I suppose they got the stamps and letters containing them which you said you sent to Will and I, for we never got them nor the papers of which you speak. 

The Rebel Prisoners we took here boast of having a good time reading our letters but these impudent scamps that stay here will capture no more letters for a while at least for they are all on their way up the Mississippi as prisoners of war.”

Camp Two Miles In Rear of Vicksburg – May 28th, 1863

Dear Wife (to Charlotte),

I again write to you amid Roar of Cannon. I am not any better in health but I hope this will find you and the little ones well.

This is the tenth day before Vicksburg. They may hold out a week longer but we will capture all of them for our lines are strong and they cannot get out and the provisions must be getting very low.

I bought a box of tobacco and got a teamster to haul it through for me and I have made just forty dollars on it by selling it out by the plug, the soldiers will pay most any price for tobacco when they are out. I have been buying and selling as the opportunity offered and I have just seventy dollars in money now and have twenty two dollars lent out to some of the boys which I will get next pay day.

There is a Mr. Dorland of Ashland County here at this time, he will start home in two weeks and I will send you sixty five dollars by him and he will leave it in the bank at Wooster for you. It will be published in the paper I think, and then you can tell when to go after it.

Let me know in your next letter if you received that $20 I sent you by Mr. Kaufman or not. I received a letter today from Mr. Jim Rodgers who appeared to be considerable interested in my affairs which I have answered in a manly way.

We have captured up to this time eighty pieces of Field Artillery and about twelve thousand stand of small arms and have taken upward of eleven thousand Prisoners.

The Rebel loss in the different battles we have had lately is about twelve thousand in killed and wounded and our loss I don’t think is quite so much say ten thousand.

Oh the Horrors of this blood was to see the dead and dying – to see wounded after laying one day and night on the field with a wound in the arm or leg which if cared for sooner would of saved their lives, but after laying in the hot sun become all blowed with maggots rolling all over the wound since many such sights are to be seen. Oh how many poor boys have lost a leg or an arm and many more their lives. If God spares me to get home, I shall try to live to his Honor & Glory and lead a consistent life.

Just let one go into our Hospitals to see the dismembered limbs and hear the groans and see the tears of suffering roll down the pale cheeks of our heroic boys who are suffering all this for our country. I have become so immune to it that it does not effect me like it did at first.

Give my love to all the friends and may our Father in Heaven preserve us all to meet again is my prayer. A kiss to Lottie, Johny and Clary, Good by, write soon, I have had no letter from you for five weeks, my undying love to you dear wife.

William McCormick

(In honor of those who shaped me, and in conjunction with the 2012 Republican National Convention which I am fortunate enough to be able to attend, each evening I will post a blog about my convention experiences, and each morning I will post a personal family document or historical story which will help you understand what makes me tick.  If you read all the historical posts, the last day, I promise you, you will feel the gratitude I do for our patriots who sacrificed their lives and fortunes for our freedoms.)

Romney’s August Colorado Energy Bus Tour

 

My rural friends in Utah:  Finally a schedule!  Plan to  run across your county line to see, hear and support Mitt Romney in person!

My friends Clay Sheffer and Bill Johnson came to Grand Junction to volunteer, and look, Clay got Mitt to sign his shirt! Why didn’t I think of that? See you there! (and just know it’s not very likely he will sign your shirt too, Clay was just extremely lucky)

Join the Romney Bus and the Republican Team across the Western Slope

Butternuts – Don’t Care For The Trouble They Are Brewing

Civil War Butternut (bŭt’ər-nŭt’) n. 

Nickname for Civil War Confederate Clothing and Federal Blue Uniforms that have been dyed with butternut and walnut extract in order to lighten then into a tan/brown or sometimes grey color. Primarily because the Confederacy had no means to uniform their army.

Political term for Confederate soldiers or partisans, during the Civil War, in the area of southern Ohio, Indiana and Illinois that opposed an anti-slavery war.

16th O.V.I. In Rear of Vicksburg, Mississippi – May 26, 1863

Dear Wife (to Lottie),

I again am permitted by kind providence as to write you again. Oh Lottie, the horrors of war. Since the first of April we have traveled from Milliken’s bend to Grand Gulf below Vicksburg and through the state of Mississippi. To this point during that time seven field battles, in every one of which our arms were victorious, and this is the seventh day before Vicksburg. Besieging the place which we will capture with all the rebels in it.

We have taken up to this time about 12 thousand prisoners and sixty pieces of artillery, with any amount of small arms. Our regiment has lost about 50 men in killed and wounded. So far, our Pioneer Corps has 5 wounded, but none killed as yet.

I have become so used to death and suffering that it hardly seems real to see hundreds of my fellow soldiers dead and dying from fearful wounds. I have been unwell for 2 weeks, and you would hardly know me if you were to see me now as I am in poor health. Our skirmishes are within 100 yards of the rebel’s main works, and our batteries are planted within 300 yards of their works.

We have them completely surrounded on all sides, and it will be impossible for any of them to get away. Our losses have been very heavy in the several engagements, but the rebel loss has been a great deal heavier than ours. We are camped within range of the rebel garret and have the pleasure of having a shell burst in amongst us every day or so, but we are used to it, and do not mind it much.

Dear Lottie, I sent you by the hands of Mr. A. J. Kaufman, of Wooster, of the Times of Botsford Kaufman and Co., twenty dollars, and I have sixty dollars more to send you by the first opportunity.

Dear Lottie, you must not think that I have forgotten you, for you are in my thoughts daily. The reason I have not written was because there was an order from our General to the effect that no letters would be sent North until he had Vicksburg in his hand, and as it is as good as in our hands, I take the privilege of writing to you hoping that you may receive these lines.

The rebel citizens feel very anxious of gaining their independence as a confederacy, but I think their hopes are founded on a sandy foundation. When Vicksburg is ours, which it will be, the Mississippi River will be in our hands from its headwater to its mouth. George McCormick’s regiment has been in all the fighting, but I have not heard anything from him whether he is living or not.

Dear Wife, there will be great suffering in the south the coming winter for their crops are all destroyed and property confiscated. As we approach most of the rebel soldiers, privates are willing to quit, but their officers will not let them. This war is about played out. The rebels say if we get Vicksburg, they may as well give up. I expect, if I am spared, that when we get done fighting, that I will get a furlough, as we have seen and done hard service for nearly two years, and we are entitled to a furlough.

Give my best wishes to all the friends and let them know that I am for God and my Country, for Truth, Justice, and Right, in all things pertaining to this glorious Union. But am emphatically down on Butternuts at home and may God forgive them, but I never care for the trouble they are brewing in our nation. Write, and direct to:

William McCormick 
c/o Capt. Patterson, Pioneer Corps 
13th Army Corps via Cairo Illinois

My unfaltering devotion and love to you and the dear children to whom I send a greeting kiss. Yours ever in the bonds of love,

William McCormick

P.S. Excuse this poor scribbling for I am weak and nervous from disease of chronic diarrhea and dry fever.

(In honor of those who shaped me, and in conjunction with the 2012 Republican National Convention which I am fortunate enough to be able to attend, each evening I will post a blog about my convention experiences, and each morning I will post a personal family document or historical story which will help you understand what makes me tick.  If you read all the historical posts, the last day, I promise you, you will feel the gratitude I do for our patriots who sacrificed their lives and fortunes for our freedoms.)

A Likeness on a Plate

These letters are sweet and melancholy and I was touched when in his first letter home, during his Civil War service, my Great Great Grandfather William McCormick asked his dear wife “Lottie” to send “hers and the children’s likenesses on one plate.”  I wondered was he asking for a photo of all 3 of them?  I brought this up when I saw my father a year or so later and wondered if he had ever received an answer to this request.

My father and I knew of a tin type of William in his uniform that had been passed down through the family and also of another one of his son, John Bechtel McCormick, as a child, but we could recollect no others. With a prayer in my heart we went up to look through the trunk of old photos and there it was, “hers and the children’s likenesses all on one plate.”

I cried, she had sent it to him and somehow that photo made it home to her and then somehow over all these years, to us.  Knowing what happened at the end of this story has played a part in shaping the person I am now and who my children will become.

Camp Cumberland Ford – March 30, 1862

Dear Wife (to Charlotte),

I received yours of the 23rd and was glad to hear from you. We have moved back on the north side of the river, two miles from where our last camp was, we moved yesterday.

I have been sick for a few days, I have a very bad cough which hurts me very much. If I do not get better soon, I shall have to go to the Hospital at Basbinsville Bart. I think I will get along very well if I get no back set.

I also received a letter from your brother William today. You say that I never said anything about that nine month scare of yours, well I thought I did. I think if you look over your letters from me, you will find that I did say something. At any rate I burned the letter according to your directions.

I wrote you in my last about our advance on the Rebels fortifications. We were compelled to fall back to this point where we will remain until we are reinforced, which will be some time yet.

I would like you to let me know if Esq. Peppards has done anything with that Mellhnich affair or not. Let me know just how things stand and I will be better satisfied.

You had better pay Jos. Miller the balance of rent on his house and I want you to draw your proportion of money that will be coming to you from the Relief Fund.

William wrote to me that he was going to move to the East of Fredericksburg on the first of April and he also said Johny was at fathers and he appeared to enjoy himself very much.

In writing to me always send an envelope and sheet of paper enclosed in your envelope as paper cannot be had here nor can we get envelopes. So you see, if you want to hear from me regular, you will have to comply with my request.

I received a half dollars worth of stamps in the letter I received last week from you. Direct all your letters as you did this last and they will come through all safe. My love to all of the friends and to Johny and Clary. Pa sends a kiss and to Ma his hearts fond affection. I must close for this time. Write soon, I remain your husband ever,

William McCormick

P.S. If you can get a package of envelopes and one quire of letter paper and send it by mail to me at a cost of twenty or thirty cents, do so and it will last a couple of months. We have to pay five cents for a single envelope and five cents a sheet for paper here. Yours, WMC

(In honor of those who shaped me, and in conjunction with the 2012 Republican National Convention which I am fortunate enough to be able to attend, each evening I will post a blog about my convention experiences, and each morning I will post a personal family document or historical story which will help you understand what makes me tick.  If you read all the historical posts, the last day, I promise you, you will feel the gratitude I do for our patriots who sacrificed their lives and fortunes for our freedoms.)

Invitations & Convention Deja Vu

Got an interesting invitation today to attend a National Review Reception in honor of William F. Buckley Jr. from Governor Jeb Bush.  Patrick J. Toomey will be a speaker.  1st reaction = Why me? How weird that I got invited, 2nd reaction = It’s at a Yacht Club ( we have so many of those in Utah), 3rd reaction = How cool! Will never have another opportunity like this so let’s embrace it!

As I reviewed the list of Convention speakers I realized that the Basalt, CO Romney event I worked at was just a mini version of our upcoming convention.  At that event I met at least half of the Convention Speakers. 11 Republican Governors were present there.

One thing I learned about Romney is that he holds Governors in high esteem, as a business professional he recognized the vast and broad spectrum of issues that Governers have to manage.  I personally believe he values this experience more than those politicos whose experience has been in running for office.

I predict a cabinet with powerful and experiences professionals unlike the Obama Administration whose appointments have been more politically based.

For your viewing pleasure, I am posting what has been provided on our convention app schedule, I’ve heard this is where events are being announced first:

Aug 26

  • Welcome Event Tropicana Field

Aug 27

2 pm – Session 1 Tampa Bay Times Forum

  • Opening Procedures and Appointment of Convention Committees
  • Opening Ceremonies
  • Welcoming Remarks and House and Senate candidates and RNC auxillaries
  • Consideration of Convention Committee Reports
  • Roll Call

7:30 pm – Session 2 Tampa Bay Times Forum

  • Remarks by Artur Davis and video
  • Remarks by Governor Rick Scott (FL)
  • RNC Video
  • Remarks by Senator Rand Paul (KY)
  • Remarks by Speaker John Boehnoer
  • Remarks by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (WA)
  • TBA
  • Remarks by RNC Chairman Reince Priebus
  • Remarks by Senate Republican Candidate Ted Cruz (TX)
  • Musical Act
  • Remarks by Governor Nikki Haley (SC)
  • Remarks by Mike Huckabee
  • Remarks by Mrs. Luce’ Vela Fortuno
  • Remarks by Mrs. Ann Romney
  • Benedictions by Sammy Rodriguez and adjournment

Aug 28

7:30 – pm RNC Convention Convenes

  • Remarks by Governor John Kasich (OH)
  • RNC video
  • Remarks by Janine Turner
  • Remarks and video by Mayor Mia Love (UT)
  • Remarks by Rick Santorum
  • Remarks by Senator Kelly Ayotte (NH) and Jack Gilcrest
  • TBA
  • Remarks by Governor Bobby Jindal
  • RNC videos
  • Remarks by Sher Valenzuela candidate for DE Lt. Governor
  • Remarks by Governor Susana Martinez (NM)
  • RNC video
  • Remarks by Governor Chris Christie (NJ)
  • Benediction and adjournment

Aug. 29

7:30 pm – RNC Convention Convenes

  • Remarks by Senator Rob Portman (OH)
  • Performance by Beau Davidson
  • TBA
  • Remarks by Senator John McCain (AZ)
  • RNC video
  • Remarks by Attorney General Pam Bondi (FL) and Attorney General Sam Olens (GA)
  • Remarks by Senator John Thune (SD)
  • Remarks by Governor Jeb Bush (FL)
  • Remarks by Senate Republican Leader and Convention Temporary Chairman Mitch McConnell (KY)
  • Remarks by Steve Cohen, Screen Machine
  • Remarks by Governor Luis Fortuno (PR)
  • Remarks by Governor Tim Pawlenty (MN)
  • Remarks by Sec. Condoleezza Rice
  • RNC video
  • Remarks by Vice Presidential nominee Rep. Paul Ryan
  • Benediction by Archbishop Demetrios
  • RNC Convention Adjournment